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How to Improve Your Skin Health and Look Younger

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The co-owner of Houppette in Greenville shares how a simple skincare regimen, along with a few key makeup techniques, can create a healthy glow.

While wrinkles may be souvenirs of a storied past or marks of wisdom that only many well-lived years can bring, those less eager to embrace them—or at least not so deeply—are searching for the fountain of youth. Fortunately, stopping the clock no longer requires turning to extremes. Here, Lizzie Johnson, co-owner of Houppette in Greenville, reveals how a simple skin care regimen and a few makeup techniques can soften lines, boost collagen and inject skin with a healthy, vibrant glow. Who says youth is wasted on the young?

302Health: What are the first signs of aging skin?

Lizzie Johnson: In addition to wrinkles, skin might appear uneven in texture or tone. Hyperpigmentation can result from sun damage, and hormonal and lifestyle changes.

302H: What skin care regimen do you recommend after age 30?

LJ: There are three major keys for caring for older skin:

Retinol. As we age, skin cell turnover slows down. Optimally, skin cells efficiently shed and renew every 28 days or so (a skin cycle). Starting in our late 30s, turnover begins to slow—and the more likely the skin is to appear dull or show texture, like fine lines and wrinkles. Be sure to include an exfoliant such as a gentle scrub or a retinol product to encourage the more efficient sloughing of skin cells. An antioxidant serum. It’s best to start this sooner rather than later. Antioxidants (we love SkinCeuticals’ CE Ferulic) fight free radical damage associated with sun exposure, keeping the skin more even-toned and preserving collagen and elastin. Sunscreen. To keep your skin looking its best, you must protect it from sun damage. As we age, our skin recovers from skin damage less efficiently, and that includes damage from sun exposure. Maintain and prolong results from your skin care regimen by wearing a quality SPF daily.

To keep your skin looking its best, you must protect it from sun damage.

302H: What’s the trick to making tired eyes appear more youthful?

LJ: There are a few tricks to try here: One of the major concerns aging women have is textural changes and loss of elasticity of the eyelids. Often, eyes become more hooded, and traditional eyelining techniques don’t work as well. Instead, try using a flat brush and a product (such as Laura Mercier’s Tightline) to line underneath the upper lashes. Press and wiggle the flat brush along the underside of the upper lash line, taking care to focus in the roots of the eyelashes. This defines and opens the eyes. Second, highlight eyelids with a brighter eye shadow. Choose a flesh-toned shadow a shade or two lighter than your natural skin tone (matte or shimmer is a matter of preference). Swipe the lighter shadow across the lid, taking care to highlight the inner corners of the eyes. Third, don’t skip under-eye concealer. Dab it around the orbital bone under the eyes and blend upwards toward the lower lash line. Less is more, but don’t forget to apply a little bit on either side of the bridge of the nose to brighten.

Starting in our late 30s, turnover begins to slow—and the more likely the skin is to appear dull or show fine lines and wrinkles.

302H: What’s the best method to achieve a healthy, youthful glow?

LJ: The right blush tone can give the appearance of that healthy, vibrant glow and make cheekbones appear a little higher. A good makeup artist can help you choose the color that works best for you.

302H: What products should older women avoid?

LJ: Be careful of foundations with too much coverage or a matte finish, or a lipstick that is too matte. Matte textures are less forgiving and tend to show lots of texture on the skin. Instead, try a formulation that is creamier and a little dewy. It’ll give your skin a healthy, youthful glow. Also, less is more—when in doubt, wear a little less.

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