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A Milton Lavender Field to Add to Your Post-Quarantine Bucket List

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Editor’s Note: This article was published as “Lavender Fields Forever” in the April 2020 issue of Delaware Today magazine, which went to press prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. The online version of the article has been updated to reflect changes due to the rapidly evolving health climate.

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It’s all about the hashtag for Lavender Fields at Milton’s Warrington Manor.

Even though the 5-acre farm doesn’t have its own Instagram account, it’s a magnet for posts from other people, says Heather Sullivan, chief of farm operations. From betrothed couples to fine artists and photographers, the setting attracts many who appreciate its beauty and want to share the experience with others.

Brides and grooms say their vows in front of the labyrinth on the farm, young girls laugh on the swings and pensive influencers pose “candidly” amid rows of flowers. Most posts are just people being happy amid the lavender.

Sullivan says people come to Lavender Fields during the summer, find it beautiful in bloom, take photos and, post them, and then the next week new people who have seen those photos show up the following week.

“The thing that brings people here is other people,” she says. She does ask people to add “DE” or “Delaware” to their hashtags, as there are other lavender fields online. The farm has Facebook and Pinterest accounts, but doesn’t do a lot of advertising. Sullivan admits they could do a better job of posting themselves on social media—she sometimes posts from farmers markets and for upcoming events—but they are a small crew and just don’t have time to keep a constant presence. “During the season,” she says, “it sells itself.”

delaware lavender field

Kat Wyman, the co-founder of SoulFire Collective Yoga Studio and Lifestyle Hub in Rehoboth Beach, made a stop at Lavender Fields at Warrington Manor to add this shot to her Instagram feed. She’s one of many who make the spot a must-visit destination for those looking to add color to their social media feeds./Photo courtesy of Kat Wyman

But this year, lavender enthusiasts may have to wait a little longer to get their coveted Instagram-worthy photos. Due to current state restrictions regarding the novel coronavirus, the property is closed to the public until further notice.

Those after handcrafted soaps and personal care products can still get their fix, however. Lavender Fields’ online shop is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Free shipping is available for orders exceeding $25. Those with questions should call the wear house at 644-2900 between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Check the property’s Facebook page for updates regarding processes and available products.

Itching to craft your own creations out of lavender? Typically, there’s a class for that. More than just a scenic social media backdrop, Lavender Fields usually offers classes from May through October and, on occasion, for the holidays. The “personal enrichment” courses include how to make wreaths, sachets, and home and personal care products.

Other classes teach you how to plant your own lavender field. Sullivan came to Lavender Fields after she was hired by the owners, Sharon Harris and Marie Mayor, to make eye pillows. Teaching others crafts that involve lavender is one of her fortes.

All classes this year are, of course, postponed until further notice, but are typically taught on the farm and offer registration through lavenderfieldsde.com. Sullivan recommends that people sign up for the farm newsletter to stay in the loop on classes and other events.

Under normal circumstances, the best time to visit is in June and July, when 3,000 lavender plants are in bloom. Taste, wear and admire this all-purpose herb during the annual Lavender Farms Festival, typically held each June, which celebrates all that is lavender with skin care products, relaxation sachets and even lavender lemonade and ice cream.

When restrictions are lifted, look forward to strolling the property; bask in butterfly, dahlia and vegetable gardens; and circle the labyrinth—an exact replica of one found embedded in the floor of the Cathedral of Chartres near Paris.

It’s the closest you can get to Provence in this country.

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