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New Exhibit Showcases “Rich Diversity” of American Artists

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More than 50 superb paintings by Stuart Davis, Arthur Dove, Thomas Eakins, Marsden Hartley, Childe Hassam, Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper, Jacob Lawrence, Georgia O’Keeffe, Horace Pippin, Maurice Prendergast, John Sloan and many others that reflect the rich diversity of style and expression in American art created between 1870 and 1950 will be on view at the Brandywine River Museum of Art, starting Feb. 25.

“From Homer to Hopper: Experiment and Ingenuity in American Art” traces the course of American modernism in the works of these artists—from the bold, investigative realism of Winslow Homer and Thomas Eakins at the end of the 19th century to the reductive views and psychological insights of Edward Hopper and Morris Graves at mid-20th century. The Phillips Collection, founded in 1918 by Duncan Phillips and opened in the Phillips family home in 1921, has always championed modernism and the rich diversity of America’s talented artists. Phillips formed his ground-breaking collection with a strong emphasis on works by artists whose critical thinking and creative originality raised American art out of relative obscurity. He challenged the perceived superiority of European over American art and sought works by women, artists of color, and native and foreign-born artists, as well as those who were self-taught, so that the collection represented a “fusion of various sensitivities” and a “unification of differences” that would parallel the multicultural character of the nation.

The Phillips Collection was the first museum to give living artists solo exhibitions, and Duncan Phillips’s support for American artists through acquisitions, commissions, exhibitions, and financial stipends was a critical factor in the careers of many. The exhibition presents a thematic chronological journey outlining Duncan Phillips’s broad collecting interests and major developments in American art from Romanticism and Realism to Cubism and Abstract Expressionism.

For more information, call 610.388.2700 or visit brandywinemuseum.org.

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