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Savor: Summer Brews

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photograph by Thom Thompson www.thomthompson.com

 

 

Clockwise from top:

 

Iron Hill: German Hefeweizen

The Hefeweizen might sound menacing, but this Bavarian wheat beer is light and a little fruity, “not because fruit is added, but because the yeast used to ferment it gives it some fruity characteristics,” says partner Mark Edelson. The brew is light-bodied and highly carbonated making it a perfect summer thirst quencher. Complex too: It starts off with a refreshing tartness.

 

Fordham Brewery: Summer Forecast

Fordham relishes in tradition with its take on the Hefeweizen weiss bier. “It’s a real traditional Bavarian style wheat beer, served cloudy,” says head brewer Walter Trifari. The medium-bodied brew comes fruity, with a hint of raspberry in its citrus-y interior. The flavor and the cloudiness are compliments of the teeming yeast. “It’s just a really great beer for a hot summer day,” Trifari says.  

 

Twin Lakes:
Route 52 Pilsner

Named for the First State’s very first scenic byway, this clean and citrus-laced pilsner is made with pure deep rock well water and full-flowered hops. The crisp, hoppy nature of the brew is what makes it stupendously drinkable in the summertime. “It’s very refreshing for a pilsner,” says Twin Lakes co-founder Matt Day. “It jumps out and grabs you.”  

 

Dogfish Head: The Festina Peche

The latest creation from Sam Calagione’s Willy Wonkian imagination is a crisp, tart offering that’s low on alcohol by Dogfish Head standards (only 4.5 percent alcohol by volume). The neo-Berliner style weisse is fermented with peaches, which creates a light, refreshing flavor.

 

Stewart’s Brewing Company:
Blue Rocks IPA
(Unnamed, as yet)

The creators of Blue Rocks Pilsner has rolled out an India Pale Ale to help sweltering baseball fans get even happier about their favorite Carolina League team. The IPA has some bite, and is exceptionally crisp for a medium-bodied ale. Its floral characteristics are the product of a West Coast yeast familiar in beers like Sierra Nevada.               —Matt Amis

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