LOADING

Type to search

The Biden Archive

Share

 

 

Photographs by Ben Fournier
 

 

 

 

As the nation welcomes our own Joe Biden into the country’s second most important office, we celebrate the aspects of life and work that have made him one of the country’s longest-serving senators: family man, party leader, crime fighter, civil rights champion, scholar of the Constitution and foreign policy expert. Delawareans now wait to see the new ways in which Joe will make us proud. By the staff and Reid Champagne

 

Joe and Jill Biden. Photograph by Luigi Ciuffetelli

 
 
Joe and Jill are on Capitol Hill, but Delaware will always be their home.
By Mark Nardone

 
 

  

It was no ordinary Return Day. The vice president-elect doesn’t usually attend–at least not as vice president-elect.
By Maria Hess

 

 
Joe Biden’s vice presidency means one thing for Delawareans, but now he belongs to the nation–and that’s for the best.
By Mark Nardone

 

 

 

 
 
Senator Joe’s shot at the vice president’s office means that the rest of the country, at long last, knows that little Delaware is not a state in New England.  By Mark Nardone
Research assistance by Matt Amis, Maria Hess and Drew Ostroski
 
 
 
 

 

Yo, Joe
Delaware Today assistant editor Matt Amis recalls his whirlwind day with our own Joe Biden.
by Matt Amis

 
 
 
 
 
And they’re all under 40. From policy makers and pageant queens to architects and chainsaw artists, these young people are changing the state.
by Matt Amis
 
 
 
 
Joe Biden is passionate. He’s experienced. He’s confident. But can the senator from little Delaware become the next president of the United States? You know Biden—all you’ve got to do is ask.
by Matt Amis
 
 
 
As the Bush-Kerry race closes in a dead heat, Delaware Senator Joe Biden is regarded by many as the closest thing to a “sure thing” in the U.S. Cabinet if Kerry wins.
By Sam Waltz
 
 

 

Beau Biden is the next Biden to watch. Will he follow in his father’s footsteps?
By Shannon Canton
 
 

 

 
Joe Biden has emerged as one of the most important voices in the Senate and, one could argue, the world.
By Mark Nardone

 

 

 

  

You Might also Like